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With its passionate romps and salacious storylines,

por Ross Laflamme (2021-02-16)


With its passionate romps and salacious storylines, Bridgerton has been a much-needed tonic for many locked-down Britons.

The Netflix series paid homage to many of the time-honoured traditions and behaviour adhered to by members of high society between 1813 and 1827, particularly surrounding courtship and marriage.

But according to an etiquette expert, a number of the more bizarre rules and protocols from the period never made it onto screen.

Filme online subtitrate \u00een rom\u00e2n\u0103 - cele mai bune surse ...Lucy Challenger, CEO of Polo & Tweed, an elite Mayfair-based agency which recruits domestic staff for the super-rich, told how etiquette originated in the French royal courts during the 17th century and used to simply mean 'keep off the grass'.

'When Louis XIV's gardener at Versailles discovered that the aristocrats were trampling through his garden, he put up signs, or "etiquets", to warn them off, but the dukes and duchesses walked right past the signs,' she explained.

'Finally, the king himself had to decree that no one was to go beyond the bounds of the etiquets.' It evolved to refer to conventional rules and see now behaviour in polite society. 

Here Lucy reveals the very strict code of etiquette women of the Bridgerton era were expected to follow.

The Netflix series paid homage to many of the time-honoured traditions and behaviour adhered to by members of high society between 1813 and 1827.

But according to an etiquette expert, a number of the more bizarre rules and protocols from the period never made it onto screen. Pictured: Phoebe Dynevor as Daphne Bridgerton and Regé-Jean Page as the Duke of Hastings

No laughing or shouting

Lucy told how there were often restrictions when it came to overtly laughing or smiling in the early 1800s.

'A woman would never raise her voice or overtly laugh or smile,' she said. 

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'As for laughing so hard she actually snorts - which Daphne Bridgerton does on meeting poor Prince Friedrich - that would be quite scandalous!' 

It's all in the eyes 

Lucy added that it was also 'completely improper' for a woman to raise her voice. 

The way to really express your emotions during an argument or confrontation - essentially the 1800s way of throwing shade - was through the eyes, a look referred to as 'the cut'.  

Essentially, if a person offended you, you would 'cut' them out - which basically means pretending they don't exist. 

The way to really express your emotions during an argument or confrontation - essentially the 1800s way of throwing shade - was through the eyes, a look referred to as 'the cut'.

Pictured: the Featherington family

'The "cut" is given by a continued stare at a person,' Lucy said. 'You should always know who you should "cut" in society - a strong and lethal etiquette practice.'

The impact on the recipient of the cut, particularly if it was delivered by someone of a respected social standing, could be devastating. 

No sitting next to a man in a carriage 

Even carriage rides in those days were a minefield of rules and regulations. 

Lucy explained: 'The gentleman always sat with his back to the horses and a non-relative would never sit next to each other to stop any indecent contact - a knee or an arm shouldn't touch.

In a carriage, the gentleman always sat with his back to the horses and a non-relative would never sit next to each other to stop any indecent contact - a knee or an arm shouldn't touch.

Pictured: Daphne Bridgerton beside her mother

'So in the series when Benedict Bridgerton positions himself next to Genevieve Delacroix in his carriage, this would have been deemed entirely improper.' 

Meanwhile a man's duty was to always pick the right horse for a woman and never keep her waiting. 

'Both riding in a carriage or horseback was acceptable for a lady, though a lady was permitted to drive her own carriage,' Lucy added.

'If she left the family estate, she required the attendance of a groom.

Similarly, on horseback she should bring an appropriate companion to protect her reputation.'